Consider this before quitting a sport midseason!

I believe in kids playing, so why am I writing about quitting sports?

The Kid’s been playing multi sports for so long and now, as a middle school student, more of her friends are beginning to specialize. Sometimes you can see the difference on the field or in the pool. The ones that practice the same thing over and over have the edge. Their muscles have formed muscle memory that make many of their movements seem more graceful, sometimes effortless. But TK doesn’t want to quit, so we continue playing seasonally.

And yet, many years ago we went through a lot of quitting….and then starting….and then quitting.

So when another parent recently asked me for my perspective on whether he should permit his child to try a sport that they had previously quit, I told them to let them play again.

Because little kids shouldn’t be held to a decision they made when they were little.

And because sports helps foster the love of movement, which is so important.

So finding the right sport is important.

And sometimes, there are factors that go into why a kid doesn’t like a sport that don’t have anything to do with the sport.

So sometimes you have to let them try again….

15 reasons why your kid might want to quit sports:

  1. Practices are too early
  2. Practices are too late
  3. The coach isn’t nice
  4. Your kid isn’t as good as the other kids
  5. Your kid’s riding the bench every game
  6. They don’t have any friends on the team or in the program
  7. The teachers or coaches play favorites and it’s so blatantly obvious because they get so many perks it’s ridic
  8. The coach is abusive
  9. It’s too cold
  10. It’s too hot
  11. Their equipment is uncomfortable
  12. They don’t like the way their parents act before, during or after a game
  13. They can’t bend like the other kids
  14. It just isn’t fun
  15. They’re burnt out

Reasons why your kid might want to quit sports mid-season

  1. It’s interfering with school
  2. It’s interfering with their social life
  3. They’re losing
  4. Their growth has leveled off while others have flourished
  5. Practice time of day – too early / too late
  6. The coach isn’t nice
  7. Your kid isn’t as good as the other kids
  8. Your kid’s riding the bench every game
  9. They don’t have any friends on the team or in the program
  10. The teachers or coaches play favorites and it’s so blatantly obvious because they get so many perks it’s ridic
  11. The coach is abusive
  12. The temperature – cold / hot
  13. Their equipment is uncomfortable
  14. They don’t like the way their parents act before, during or after a game
  15. It just isn’t fun
  16. They’re burnt out

See a trend? There are many reasons why a kid may want to quit a sport, even mid-season. Some factors are within your control (that means you, Mom & Dad), while others aren’t (Coach, friends, weather). So how you do you help your kid get through a tough season, or stick with something that they may be really great at?

While we have permitted our child to quit a sport, we have tried to get through an entire season (not year) before quitting. Our messaging has been that they’ve made a commitment and they must see it through. If, however, there is an issue of physical pain, injury or abuse, then we believe in quitting asap and speaking to a doctor or the appropriate party.

Yet, getting your child to continue to do something that he or she is resistant to can be a hassle. Take your smart kid aside and after explaining commitment, come up with a solution that works for both of you. Perhaps it means not making every practice, but making most of them. Attending practice, but not participating. Or talking to the coach and wearing layers.

Changing the goal from winning to something measurable is another great way to help make your kid view a sport differently. Switching from rewarding wins to rewarding effort or smaller achievable goals can also provide your child with positive reinforcement.

But let’s just say that even after all that, your kid wants to quit. Car rides are filled with tears and your kid sits on the sidelines pouting for all to see.  Let it go. See if you can get a refund, transfer the program to another kid, or use the credit toward another sport. Then back off and revisit in a year or so. You might be surprised when they ask if they can try again.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related Post

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *