ScoutJr.com,fave

10 Tips to Get on the Coach’s Good Side

Follow these guidelines to get and stay on the coach’s good side….

1. EMAILS:

Read them.  Respond promptly, or within 24 hours.  Your team needs to know your availability and your commitment.  So if they don’t hear from you, they can’t plan around you being there.

2. DO WHAT YOU SAY YOU’RE GOING TO DO:

If you commit to something, do it. So if you say your child is available on Mondays make sure that they’re available on Mondays.

3. ATTENDANCE

Be on time. In fact, be early.  We read somewhere that the kid who is the first to show up and the last to leave after working hard are the ones that make the best impression.

  • If you’re going to be late, send an email or a text. Or, better yet, if the timing is a problem just give the team a heads up that your child will always be late by X amount of time.
  • Gonna miss a practice? Let the team manager know.  Practices cost time and money.  If there aren’t enough kids, then your team manager may opt to cancel practice and reschedule for another day when more kids can make it.

4. BE READY TO PLAY:

That means your child is in uniform. They’ve been fed and used the restroom. Hair is up and jewelry is off. Shoes are tied.

5. PAYMENT:

Pay on time. Many coaches are volunteers devote countless hours to administrative issues. Paying on time means just one trip to the bank instead of a dozen.  It also ensures that bills can be paid on time instead of scrambling for payment, or worse paying out of their own pocket.  If there are financial hardships, talk to your coach at the start of the season so that a plan can be arranged if possible.

6.  CRITICISM:

We all have it, and it’s easy to criticize the people who are doing the work, especially after a loss. Share your thoughts with the coach in a positive way instead of on the sidelines, especially if it concerns playing time which may be tied in to specific issues.  Give the coach the benefit of the doubt.  Anyone who volunteers to coach has good intentions.

7. BE PART OF THE SOLUTION:

Offer to bring fruit or orange slices to a game or host a team building event. Volunteer to help set up goals at the start of the season.  Managing and coaching teams take a lot of effort.  Creating a positive, unified team needs help from all members.  Your contributions are recognized by all the players as well as the staff.

8. STRESS HARD WORK:

Trainers and managers understand that there are different levels of playing ability. The single most important thing that any kid can do at practice (or in life, we think) is work hard.  Hard work never goes unnoticed.

“Hard work never goes unnoticed”

9. REWARD HARD WORK:

It’s easy to get caught up in wins or losses. Short of playing much weaker teams, the only way to get better is to work hard.  After a tough loss be sure to commend your child or his/her teammates on their hard work, IF they were working hard.  Commend passing the ball, getting open, battling, not giving up.  Acknowledge that it was a tough loss, but don’t make excuses.

10. HAVE FUN:

Keep everything in perspective and know that these years go by quickly. Enjoy watching your child, win or lose, and let them know how much you love watching them.  Your attitude is contagious!

 

 

Related Post

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *